Seminars

2019 Vermont Flower Show Seminar Schedule

PLEASE check back prior to the event for any changes or updates.

You can download a copy of the seminar schedule at the bottom of this page.

Friday – March 1, 2019

10:30 AM – Room A

The Container Revolution—Charlie Nardozzi, www.GardeningwithCharlie.com.  Container gardening continues to be a hot trend. Charlie will cover what you need to know to be successful growing flowers, edibles, and even trees and shrubs in pots. He will cover the different types of containers, matching the right plant to the right container. We’ll discuss container soils, fertilizers and pest control; plus, tips on the best types of plants to grow in containers. Charlie is a consultant, national author and lecturer, and appears often on radio and television. With many gardeners downsizing their gardens or wanting to garden but not having a permanent space to build a garden, small and portable are keys to gardening success and happiness. In this talk Charlie will cover all the ways you can garden in small spaces from raised beds, containers, vertical gardens, hanging planters and even indoor growing. For those gardeners on the move, Charlie will pay particular attention to growing plants that are easy to transplant and move and structures that can also come with you. Free Velcro Plant Ties will be given

10:30 AM – Room B

Simple, Successful Garden DesignJanet Macunovich, www.GardenAtoZ.com Learn simple steps to designing a garden: how to match the garden to specific people’s needs, determine a budget, assess the site, arrange the plants, and be sure the finished garden gets the care it will need to look great. This approach is perfect for a new garden or new gardener. It has also been acclaimed by experienced gardeners who are renovating existing beds to improve the look and reduce the maintenance needed. This professional gardener and author will give you the steps needed to be successful, as she does with clients nationwide.


12:00 noon – Room A

Gardening in a Changing Climate—Leonard Perry, Horticulturist-in-Residence, King’s Garden, Fort Ticonderoga, www.fortticonderoga.org/. Whether you believe the science that shows the climate is really changing, or just want to know how to garden successfully when faced with climate extremes, you’ll learn tips and plants from this presentation.  Coping with cold, handling the heat, too much water, “extreme” perennials that handle climate extremes well, and potential pests and problems will be covered.    Some “green” gardening tips will be provided to help you lessen your environmental impact.  You’ll learn what “phenology” is, how this relates, and the fun you can have using it to track your own climate from year to year.

12:00 noon – Room B

From Classic to Whimsey: the Art of Decorating our Outdoor Spaces Judith Irven, Outdoor Spaces Landscape Designs, www.outdoorspacesvermont.com .  In this extensively illustrated talk, we examine some of the delightful ways non-living elements can add both elegance and fun in every garden.  See how a graceful sculpture creates a focal point, an arbor emphasizes an entrance, a bench with a view invites us to stay awhile, water evokes peace and tranquility, a huge hidden pot becomes a surprise, a group of chairs suggests an al fresco lunch, fanciful creations make us laugh, and a collection of metal peacocks say WOW!


1:30 PM – Room A

Vegetable Gardening BasicsCharlie Nardozzi, ww.GardeningwithCharlie.com.  Are you looking to start a vegetable garden or improve the one you already have? In this talk, Charlie will be covering the basics of vegetable gardening, with tips on varieties and techniques that will make gardening easier, more fun and productive. There will be ideas for beginning and experienced veggie growers, and plenty of time for questions about your own vegetable garden. Charlie is a consultant, national author and lecturer, and appears often on radio and television.

1:30 PM – Room B

Caring for Perennials—Janet Macunovich, www.GardenAtoZ.comPerennials–plants such as peonies that can be planted and come back year after year–provide unmatched color in a landscape. Yet some perennial gardens are more attractive than others because the gardener uses simple techniques described in this presentation to extend flowering, improve after-bloom appearance and avoid insect and disease problems. So, come take a look at what to do when, throughout a complete gardening season to stay on top of what needs to be done with less effort, in less time. This professional gardener shares 40 years of experience so you can keep your garden better, easier, and enjoy it more.


3:00 PM – Room A

Pests and Diseases of 2018 Ann Hazelrigg, UVM Extension., www.uvm.edu/pss/pd/pdc/.   The director of the UVM Plant Diagnostic Clinic, with years of experience dealing with all kind of problems on all kinds of plants, will talk about some of the problems she saw in the field, gardens and landscapes last summer and what new and “exciting” problems are on the horizon.

3:00 PM – Room B

The Budget-Wise GardenerKerry Ann Mendez, Perennially Yours, www.pyours.com .  Kerry gives the inside scoop on nailing the best deals and having it all: selecting plants that give you the most bang for your buck, timing your purchases to take advantage of deep discounts and giveaways, finding treasures at plant, bulb and seed swaps, and much more. This award-winning and dynamic speaker, garden designer, and author delivers practical tips, based on her most recent book (available to buy and have signed.)


4:30 PM – Room A

Beyond the Beauty in Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home’s Abundant GardensAndrea Luchini, Hildene, Manchester, VT, www.hildene.org.   Join the Hildene horticulturist for a presentation and Q and A about the role the historic site’s gardens, from the Formal to the Butterfly, play in our mission: Values into Action. With our commitment to conservation and sustainability, the grounds and gardens of Hildene are becoming true pollinator and songbird sanctuaries. By adding native plants to the gardens, using biological controls in the greenhouse, prioritizing songbird habitat in our woodlands, and practicing rotational grazing in our pastures, we are striving to maintain a balanced ecosystem. Learn how Hildene, deeply rooted in history, is putting down new roots for future generations.

4:30 PM – Room B

Hard Cider: Rediscovering the Roots of the Trendiest Drink on the Menu Terry Bradshaw, UVM Plant and Soil Science Department, www.uvm.edu/~pss/?Page=faculty/facultybradshaw.php.   In this talk, Dr. Bradshaw will discuss the history of hard cider making, simple steps to making your own cider, and the impact of the growth in cider on the Vermont apple industry. He knows the subject well, having made cider for over 20 years, operated a commercial cider mill, and maintained a small home orchard while overseeing the UVM Horticulture Research and Education Center. Since joining the UVM faculty in 2014, he has directed the apple research program with several projects designed to increase the sales, quality,  and profitability of Vermont apples grown for cideries.


Saturday – March 2, 2019

10:30 AM – Rooms A

EcoBeneficial Gardening 101: Boosting the Ecosystem In Your Own YardKim Eierman, www.EcoBeneficial.comYour yard is more than a combination of trees, shrubs and perennials – it’s a complex system where all living things are connected.  Gardening with an ecosystem approach contributes to species diversity, attracting and supporting more birds, butterflies, pollinators, and beneficial insects. This nationally-known speaker and consultant will explain how the design choices you make, the plants you select, and the maintenance practices you use can make a huge difference in creating a beautiful, healthy ecosystem, filled with life.

10:30 AM – Rooms B

Mini-MeadowsMike Lizotte, www.AmericanMeadows.comA mini meadow — a kind of informal flower garden started with seed sown directly into the soil — can be any size; plus, it’s fun, easy to grow, and good for the planet. It uses less water than a traditional lawn, and provides habitat for pollinators — not to mention a natural exploration space for children. From choosing the right variety of seeds, preparing the soil, sowing evenly, and watering well, this author will offer gardeners of all levels the keys to creating, caring for, and reaping the rewards of thriving meadows through the seasons, year after year.


12:00 noon – Room A

The Budget-Wise Gardener—Kerry Ann Mendez, Perennially Yours, www.pyours.com.  Kerry gives the inside scoop on nailing the best deals and having it all: selecting plants that give you the most bang for your buck, timing your purchases to take advantage of deep discounts and giveaways, finding treasures at plant, bulb and seed swaps, and much more. This award-winning and dynamic speaker, garden designer, and author delivers practical tips, based on her most recent book (available to buy and have signed).

12:00 noon – Room B

The Roving Gardener: Visiting Five Great Gardens in Massachusetts Judith Irven, Outdoor Spaces Landscape Designs, www.outdoorspacesvermont.com.  Whether or not you have a garden of your own, spending a few hours in a magnificent garden that somebody else has created is the perfect summer pastime! In this beautifully illustrated talk,we visit five unique and extensive gardens in nearby Massachusetts, from the Garden in the Woods in the east all the way to the Berkshire Botanical Gardens in the west.   Each of these great gardens offers insights and inspiration for every gardener, plus relaxation and pleasure for all.

 


1:30 PM – Room A

The Emerald Ash Borer V.J. Comai , Burlington City Arborist; Elise Schadler, VT. Dept. Forests, Parks, and Recreation; Nancy Knox, Branch Out Burlington—Can you identify ash trees, so prevalent in our communities and in our forests? Do you know how to spot this destructive new invasive pest to Vermont, that quickly can kill ash trees—what it looks like and symptoms of its damage? Come learn these, plus management options available to you, and ways in which citizens can help their communities deal with this pest.

1:30 PM – Room B

A Four Season Landscape for the Birds– Marijke Niles, Marijke’s Perennial Gardens Plus, Starksboro, VT, www.perennialgardensplus.comIt takes more than pretty flowers and delicious berries to make the birds happy. And it saves us time and money when we do it right. Small steps can create big results. Come and learn about what we can do to make even our smallest backyard bird-friendly all year long. People love those gardens too!


3:00 PM – Room A

Worthy but Underused PerennialsSarah Salatino, Full Circle Gardens, Essex,VT,  www.fullcirclegardens.com.   In spite of all the new and trendy perennials you find each year in garden catalogs and magazines, there’s a whole world of excellent perennial varieties available that have been around for generations, yet are underused. In the quest for the newest and hottest varieties, these proven and hardy classic varieties have been nearly forgotten. Come discover these easy care, tough perennials that are long lived, need little care once they are planted, and will create stunning displays. Some are natives, which will benefit your pollinators.

3:00 PM – Room B

Mindful Pest ManagementSarah L. Kingsley Richards, UVM Plant and Soil Science Department.   If you garden you invariably have to deal with and manage pests. Learn from this horticulturist and pesticide education specialist how to apply the principles of Integrated Pest Management to guide decisions in your garden. Discover all the important parts of product labels so you can make informed choices. Make sure you know proper and prudent practices to reduce risks to yourself and the environment.


4:30 PM – Room A

Vermont’s Common and Rare Spring Wildflowers—Aaron Marcus, Assistant Botanist, Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife.  As we eagerly await spring’s spectacular displays of woodland wildflowers, spend time with this botanist viewing inspiring photos of ones you commonly see, as well as others that are rarely seen. Many of these early-blooming flowers are called “spring ephemerals,” as they grow luxuriantly for a month or two, and then go to sleep for the rest of the summer. Whether you are new to Vermont’s wildflowers, or you are eagerly waiting to dust off your botany books for the coming season, you are sure to learn something new and fascinating for your April and May walks in the woods.

4:30 PM – Room B

Using Landscape Plants for Home and HealthLisa Hoare, Garden Educator and Emily Clairmont, Registered Dietitian, UVM Medical Center.  From spring-flowering fruit trees, shade-providing walnut trees and grapevines, to the brilliant red fall color of blueberry bushes, adding such plants to your garden not only diversifies your landscape and harvest, but also provides much ornamental interest as well.  In this workshop, view some inspiring ways to incorporate perennial fruits, herbs, and flowers in your garden. Additionally, you’ll gain knowledge on the nutritional benefits and how to use them in delicious, simple-to-prepare recipes.


Sunday, March 3, 2019

10:30 AM – Room A

The Pollinator Victory Garden: Winning the War on Pollinator DeclineKim Eierman, www.EcoBeneficial.com.   Many pollinator species have suffered serious declines in recent years. It’s a serious problem for all of us since pollinators are responsible for the pollination of 80% of all flowering plants, and at least 30% of the food that we eat. Unfortunately, most of our landscapes offer little in the way of appropriate habitat and forage. With simple strategies, you can attract and support not just bees, but an array of pollinators that have different requirements. Learn from this nationally-known environmental horticulturist how to create a Pollinator Victory Garden to help win the war on pollinator decline.

10:30 AM – Room B

From Garden to Lake, Using the Soil Phosphorus Index to Guide Landscape Decisions In Sensitive Watersheds—Becky Tharp, Watershed Consulting, www.watershedca.com. Garden and landscape soils are managed to feed plants. But what other impacts does fertilizer and a soil’s nutrient content have on water quality? Whether you live lakeside or far up in the mountains, your garden and the choices that you make in soil and compost selection for lawn and other planted areas can have far reaching implications on our water resources. Learn what the soil “P” index is and how to wield it so that our plants stay green and our rivers stay blue.


12:00 noon – Room A

Understanding and Supporting Healthy Soils Through Simple Lawn Care PracticesNatasha Duarte, Composting Association of Vermont and Kris Stepenuck, University of Vermont and Lake Champlain Sea Grant Extension.  Do you care about the environment and want to have a lush, green lawn? In this talk we’ll touch on the properties that characterize healthy soils and share simple steps that you can take to put the science to work, so that your lawn will be more resilient in extreme climate events – from drought to torrential rain fall, and everything in between. We’ll also cover when, what type and how much fertilizer you should (or should not) apply to keep your lawn growing strong throughout the season.

12:00 noon – Room B

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Fruit Trees but Were Afraid to Ask— Nicko Rubin, East Hill Tree Farm, Plainfield, www.easthilltreefarm.com.   Fruit trees can provide a lifetime of bounty or frustration and expense. Join this nursery owner as he shares know-how that can ensure success with fruit trees, from soil preparation and planting to restoring old trees. Discussion will cover apples, pears, plums and cherries, as well as soil and site considerations, companion plants and understory management. Plenty of time will be given for questions and answers.


1:30 PM – Room A

Dry Stone Walls of Great BritainJamie Masefield, Masefield  Dry Stone Masonry, LLC,  www.jamiemasefield.com.   This stone craftsman will show the different styles of walling that have developed over many centuries in Great Britain and how these have worked for inhabitants of different areas based on the materials that were available to them. In recent times there, communities of each region take pride in the unique qualities of their walls. Basic principles of construction are extremely helpful and applicable for Vermont homeowners considering their own projects and stone walls.

1:30 PM – Room B

Berries, Berries, Berries!— Nicko Rubin, East Hill Tree Farm, Plainfield, VT, www.easthilltreefarm.comLooking to grow more fruit? Join this nursery owner as he shares his experiences with, and covers the basics of successfully growing, a wide range of long-lived productive berry plants in Vermont. Included will be tips for aronia, black raspberry, blueberry, currant, gooseberry, goumi, hardy kiwi, honeyberry, raspberry, and seaberry. Discussion will range from varieties and siting to management and harvest. Leave ready to fill your yard with fruit!

DOWNLOAD THE 2019 VFS SEMINAR SCHEDULE HERE.